"Agenda setting" theory: A perspective on television and politics that argues that the media tell us not so much what to think, but rather what to think about. See interview with Dr. Lynda Lee Kaid.

Broadcasting: A term originally associated with seed sowing, a broadcast is a radio or television signal transmitted for general public listening or viewing.

Commercial broadcasting: Broadcast programs that are paid for by sponsored advertising.

Communication: According to Sterling and Kittross, "The transmission and reception of information through any medium between and among humans and/or machines and/or animals" (606).

CPB - Corporation for Public Broadcasting: A group of government-funded broadcasting organizations, including PBS and National Public Radio, which were established under the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 to enhance non-commercial television programming. See www.cpb.org.

Demographics-profile: A breakdown of a broadcast audience by different statistical characteristics, for example, sex, age, family size, education, economic level, race, etc.

"Direct effects" theory: A perspective on television and politics that argues that media messages directly affect the behavior of those exposed to them. See interview with Dr. Lynda Lee Kaid.

Information: Knowledge conveyed or received by another person, including the kind of knowledge that is unintentional.

Intelligence: In the area of communication, most people now refer to intelligence as information that has military value; for example, spy planes collect intelligence on the movement of enemy troops

Mass Communication: The characteristics of mass communication concern its direction, usually one-way, the nature of its source, usually of single origin, and the means through which the message is transmitted, for example through television, radio, or newspapers. (See Sterling and Kittross, 610).

Mass Media: Forms of mass media include newspapers, magazines, radio broadcasting, television broadcasting, and motion pictures. These media serve as the "channels" through which mass communication is achieved (See Sterling and Kittross, 610). See also www.medialit.org.

Ratings: Proportion of all television homes that are tuned to a given program. Contrast a program's ratings with its share, the proportion of homes using television at that time that are tuned to the particular program. See www.nielsenmedia.com.

Sound bite: A short, edited clip of a television news interview, speech, or remark that tries to convey as much meaning in as little time as possible, often at the expense of context and qualification.

Spot: An informal term for a broadcast commercial.

Share: The proportion of homes using television at that time that are tuned to the particular program. See www.nielsenmedia.com.

"Uses and gratification" theory: A perspective on television and politics that argues that people pay attention to political media messages in order to use them in certain ways. See interview with Dr. Lynda Lee Kaid.