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Lesson #1

Civil Rights: In Their Words (Part 1)

Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.1 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.2 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.3 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.4 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.5 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.6 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.8 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.9 Lesson Goal: How were the lives of black and white Americans different during the 1960s? Time: 20-40 minutes Materials:   - Civil Rights video clips - “Blackjack Video Analysis Sheet Procedures: 1. “Today we will be looking at the lives of Americans in the 1960s. We will be showing you video interviews of different people’s views on race. What is interesting about these interviews is that they actually took place one week after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. As you watch, I want you to think about how they are different. 2. Students begin by examining 11 short video clips. Each clip gives a short overview of the life of person living in the 1960s and their views on the Civil Rights Movement. These can be shown to the class by the teacher on one screen, or if your classroom allows it, they can break into groups and look at them individually. For each clip, you may use the “BLACKJACK” sheet to guide the discussion. 3. After the class has observed the video clips, begin a class discussion to address the Lesson Goal. Probing questions: a. What advantages did white Americans have that black Americans did not? b. In what ways did white Americans display prejudice towards black Americans? c. What are some things that black Americans can do to improve their situation? d. What are some things that white Americans can do to improved the situation of black Americans? Assessment:   Students will be assessed based upon their responses with the “BLACKJACK” sheet as well as their responses to the follow up probing questions?

Supplemental Materials

CLICK HERE for Lesson #1 Supplemental Materials
MUSEUM OF BROADCAST COMMUNICATIONS
        360 North State Street, Chicago, IL 60654-5411  P. 312-245-8200      Museum of Broadcast Communications (MBC) © 2017   All rights reserved.©  
 Museum of Broadcast Communications was made possible thanks to a generous grant by:
                                                      I Terms Of Use I Privacy Policy I Contact Us I

Lesson #1

Civil Rights: In Their Words (Part 1)

Standards: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.1 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.2 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.3 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.4 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.5 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.6 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.8 CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.9 Lesson Goal: How were the lives of black and white Americans different during the 1960s? Time: 20-40 minutes Materials:   - Civil Rights video clips - “Blackjack Video Analysis Sheet Procedures: 1. “Today we will be looking at the lives of Americans in the 1960s. We will be showing you video interviews of different people’s views on race. What is interesting about these interviews is that they actually took place one week after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. As you watch, I want you to think about how they are different. 2. Students begin by examining 11 short video clips. Each clip gives a short overview of the life of person living in the 1960s and their views on the Civil Rights Movement. These can be shown to the class by the teacher on one screen, or if your classroom allows it, they can break into groups and look at them individually. For each clip, you may use the “BLACKJACK” sheet to guide the discussion. 3. After the class has observed the video clips, begin a class discussion to address the Lesson Goal. Probing questions: a. What advantages did white Americans have that black Americans did not? b. In what ways did white Americans display prejudice towards black Americans? c. What are some things that black Americans can do to improve their situation? d. What are some things that white Americans can do to improved the situation of black Americans? Assessment:   Students will be assessed based upon their responses with the “BLACKJACK” sheet as well as their responses to the follow up probing questions?

Supplemental Materials

CLICK HERE for Lesson #1 Supplemental Materials